3 – 4 month contact - Better Lives Healthy Futures

3 – 4 month contact

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When your baby is three to four months old you'll be contacted by your health visitor, or a member of the team.

What happens at this visit?

At this time we’ll talk about how you are feeling and ask some questions about your mental wellbeing as well as how you are doing physically.

Introducing solid food usually starts when your baby is about six months old but you might be starting to think about it, so find out more about weaning your baby by reading the information below.

Now’s also a good time to think about caring for your baby’s teeth as they start to come through. Again, there’s some great information below and the health visiting team can give you give you further advice if you need it.

Before we see you

As well as taking a look at the useful information below, don’t forget to check the back of your baby’s Red Book. You can record your baby’s ‘firsts’ here – like their first laugh!

Your appointment

If you need to book or rearrange a visit, please contact us:

Health visiting Bradford: 01274 221223

Health visiting Wakefield: 01924 310130

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Caring for your crying baby

All babies cry, and some more than others. Crying is your baby’s way of telling you they need comfort and care.
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Maternal and paternal mental health

Feeling worried or stressed, or even feeling a little down throughout and after your pregnancy can be normal but it’s important to realise when these feelings become more serious.
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Parent infant relationship

Your relationship with your baby starts much earlier than the first time you meet them.
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Infant feeding

Feeding your baby in the right way for you both can help get your baby get off to the best start in life.
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Breastfeeding

There are many benefits to breastfeeding for both you and your baby and in the first few days you and your baby will still be getting to know each other.
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Bottle feeding

If you choose to bottle feed you may still want to give the first few feeds of colostrum (first milk) before going on to bottle feeding.
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Safe sleep

Safe sleep is very important. You, and anyone helping you, needs to understand how to keep your baby safe whilst they sleep.
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Immunisation and vaccinations

Immunisation is a way of protecting against serious infectious diseases.
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Baby blues

During the first week after having a baby, many women get what’s often called the ‘baby blues’. Women can experience low mood at a time when they expect to feel happy.
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Safety

Don’t forget the importance of safety which means seeing everything at your child’s level, giving them age appropriate toys, supervising them, removing dangers and items that could cause harm.
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Development

There’s lots of research that shows the amazing speed a baby’s brain is developing.
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Play

Play is not just fun, it helps young children to learn.
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Introducing solid foods (weaning)

You can begin to give your baby food and drinks, other than milk, from six months old.
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Nutrition and exercise

There’s lots of information about nutrition and exercise for adults or children
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Vitamins

Vitamin D helps keep bones and teeth healthy. It is needed to absorb calcium from the diet.
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Further information

Caring for your baby at night

Becoming a parent is a special time. Getting to know your new baby can be one of the most rewarding experiences but it can also be challenging, especially when you’re tired. This unicef leaflet provides some helpful advice.

Tiny Happy People

This BBC website offers a collection of learning activities and fun things to do with children aged 3-6 months.

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH)

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a condition where the ‘ball and socket’ joint of the hip doesn’t properly form in babies and young children. Find out more information about it here and in your red book.